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FAQ

Q: What are some of the warning signs of Dry Eye? How is it best detected?
A: Warning signs can accumulate quite gradually over many years. Not uncommonly among contact lens wearers, they may incorrectly assume the lenses are old and need to be replaced. Other times the eyes water a bit more, or burn, or itch. Many, many cases are sub-clinical – they can only be diagnosed with the use of microscopic detection and special equipment!
We look at tear quality, tear meniscus, and gland structure. Research has pointed towards the testing of tear osmolarity as a reliable indicator of
the disease in terms of pre-treatment and post-treatment situations.

Q: What is the examination like to determine whether someone is suffering from Dry Eyes?
A: A full dry eye evaluation may include a series of tests depending on initial signs and symptoms, systemic history, medication, and lifestyle. Most of these tests are non-invasive and are painless. They can range from special colored dyes placed on the eyelid to assess severity, direct visualization of the oil glands to check for meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) or atrophy, to tear production analysis to name a few. The evaluation will be tailored to narrow down the specific cause of Dry Eye Syndrome.

Q: What are specialty contact lenses?
A: Specialty contact lenses are contact lenses made for people who have trouble wearing regular contact lenses because of some type of eye health or vision issue. If you have dry eyes, or astigmatism, or kerataconus, you may have been told that you can't wear contact lenses. However, we now have new technology that allows us to fit all different types of patients with contact lenses that are comfortable, and provide great vision. These contact lenses require special fittings, performed by an eye doctor who is trained in this area, and knows what contact lenses will be best for your particular condition.

Q: About 5 years ago, I was told I was not a good candidate for contacts. I have odd shaped eyes. Are there new options available today?
A: There a many options available in contact lens for patient's that have "odd shaped eyes" also known as astigmatism. Occasionally patient's will have a degenerative corneal condition that may need a specialty medically necessary contact lens and we do that at our office as well.